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Local Regs/Incentives


October 3, 2013 | Posted by Elizabeth Larsen 10/3/2013 | Permalink

Local Law 87 was passed in 2009 as part of New York City’s “Greener, Greater Buildings Plan.” It requires energy audits and retro-commissioning to be carried out every 10 years for buildings exceeding 50,000 square feet (and certain other buildings located on the same tax lot or under the same condominium management that together comprise 100,000 square feet). The first energy efficiency reports documenting the completion of the audit and the retro-commissioning measures used for certain properties—those located on a Tax Block number that ends in the digit 3—are due to the NYC Department of Buildings by the end of this 2013 calendar year. See the reporting schedule below for all affected NYC properties.

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April 25, 2011 | Posted by Daggan, Clinton | Permalink

GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the NYC Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws that are relevant to building owners and tenants in New York City.  This post summarizes the NYC Green Codes Task Force proposals and Local Laws enacted for the Energy Fundamentals category.

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April 21, 2011 | Posted by Rebecca L. Cossin | Permalink

GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the NYC Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws that are relevant to building owners and tenants in New York City.  This post summarizes the NYC Green Codes Task Force proposals and Local Laws enacted for the "Overarching Issues" category.  Recently two of these three proposals became Local Laws.

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April 18, 2011 | Posted by Larsen, Elizabeth | Permalink

GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the NYC Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws that are relevant to building owners and tenants in New York City.  This post summarizes the NYC Green Codes Task Force proposals and Local Laws enacted for the Energy Efficiency category.

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April 15, 2011 | Posted by Winefsky, Josh | Permalink

GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the NYC Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws that are relevant to building owners and tenants in New York City.  This post summarizes the NYC Green Codes Task Force proposals and Local Laws enacted for the Water Efficiency category.

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April 13, 2011 | Posted by Hindriks, Inge | Permalink

New York City has recently passed a spate of local laws aimed at “greening” the City’s buildings.  These laws, which impose mandatory baseline requirements, stand to function as a significant accompaniment to voluntary programs such as LEED in making progress toward reducing the City’s carbon footprint.  Based on 111 recommendations released on February 1, 2010 by the NYC Green Codes Task Force – an initiative led by the Urban Green Council, the New York Chapter of the US Green Building Council and originally called for by Mayor Bloomberg in response to PlaNYC – the New York City Council has enacted numerous local laws affecting new as well as existing buildings.  GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws and note how these laws impact building owners and tenants in New York City.

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March 29, 2011 | Posted by Winefsky, Josh | Permalink

In December of 2009, as part of Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC initiative, the New York City Council enacted Local Law 84, which requires owners of certain covered buildings to benchmark energy and water use (the scope and process of this requirement are described in this post).  The inaugural benchmarking due date was intended to be May 1, 2011.  However, on March 21, 2011 the City’s Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability announced that “for at least three months after May 1, 2011, no penalty will be assessed due to failure to comply with the benchmarking requirements of Local Law 84.”  Thus, the deadline for compliance has effectively been extended until August 1, 2011 to allow owners of covered buildings additional time to get acquainted with the benchmarking procedure.

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January 5, 2011 | Posted by Elizabeth Larsen | Permalink

Since December 2009, New York City's Food Retail Expansion to Support Health (FRESH) Program has offered financial benefits, such as tax reductions and exemptions, and zoning incentives, such as increased floor area and waiver of parking requirements, to businesses that expand or create new grocery stores in targeted areas. The City Council's FoodWorks report, released on November 22, 2010, proposes aggressive marketing of the FRESH Program, among other things, to encourage the expansion of fresh food retail in underserved areas of the City. On November 29, 2010, the Department of City Planning proposed expanding the applicability of the FRESH Program to commercial corridors in Queens Community District 12. To date, the following three projects have received financial incentives under the FRESH program: a new Foodtown in the Norwood section of the Bronx; a new Western Beef in the Tremont section of the Bronx; and a new Associated Supermarket in the Morrisania section of the Bronx. 

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December 7, 2010 | Posted by Winefsky, Josh | Permalink

Earning LEED certification requires the accumulation of credits in a variety of categories.  The more credits a development or renovation project achieves, the higher the LEED rating the project will receive.  For some projects that seek LEED certification, the identification of “low-hanging fruits,” those easy to achieve and low-cost credits, can be a starting point in project planning.

One such credit, Sustainable Sites Credit 7.2: Heat Island Effect – Roof, awards points for installation of a roof with a high solar reflectance index (“SRI”), or a vegetated roof.  SRI is the measure of a surface’s ability to reflect solar heat – a standard black surface has an SRI of 0, while a standard white surface has an SRI of 100.

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November 15, 2010 | Posted by Daggan, Clinton | Permalink

On October 13, 2010, the New York City Council enacted a set of local laws that address the water efficiency of New York City buildings by amending the New York City Plumbing Code (the “Plumbing Code”).  These laws codify several recommendations that were made by the NYC Green Codes Task Force (the “Task Force”) in its February 2010 report to Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg.  The Task Force was convened by the Urban Green Council to recommend green changes to the laws and regulations affecting buildings in New York City.  These new laws are consistent with the goal of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (“LEED”) program to reduce the amount of potable water used by buildings while still meeting the needs of the building’s systems and occupants.

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