Department Contacts
212.715.9387
212.715.9155
212.715.9290
212.715.9199
212.715.7838
Topics

Energy Efficiency


July 30, 2012 | Posted by Ryan Issa | Permalink

Until recently the majority of sustainable construction activity has been focused on new construction.  Today there is a movement in major cities toward green retrofits in both privately and publicly owned buildings.  Because new construction represents only a small portion of the overall building population, green retrofits and sustainable renovations of existing buildings can make a larger impact on the environment.  Recent New York City green retrofits of the Empire State Building, the JP Morgan Headquarters, and the 125 Broad Street Tower showcase the potential benefits of major green retrofit projects.

read more
April 25, 2011 | Posted by Daggan, Clinton | Permalink

GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the NYC Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws that are relevant to building owners and tenants in New York City.  This post summarizes the NYC Green Codes Task Force proposals and Local Laws enacted for the Energy Fundamentals category.

read more
April 18, 2011 | Posted by Larsen, Elizabeth | Permalink

GreenEsq. is featuring an ongoing series of posts in an effort to track the progress of the NYC Green Codes Task Force’s proposals and any resulting local laws that are relevant to building owners and tenants in New York City.  This post summarizes the NYC Green Codes Task Force proposals and Local Laws enacted for the Energy Efficiency category.

read more
April 12, 2011 | Posted by Larsen, Elizabeth | Permalink

Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data indicate that, in the U.S., buildings account for approximately 40 percent of energy use and the residential building sector accounts for approximately 21 percent of total carbon emissions.  Jonathan Rose Companies, with funding from the EPA’s Smart Growth Program, released a study in January 2011 on the effects of housing location and housing type on household energy consumption.  The study finds that transit-oriented development is more efficient than conventional suburban development, and that multifamily and single-family attached homes are more efficient than single-family stand-alone homes.  The paper illustrates how the proximity of housing to transit and the type of housing—along with energy-efficient features of homes and vehicles—are major variables for household energy consumption.

read more
March 29, 2011 | Posted by Winefsky, Josh | Permalink

In December of 2009, as part of Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC initiative, the New York City Council enacted Local Law 84, which requires owners of certain covered buildings to benchmark energy and water use (the scope and process of this requirement are described in this post).  The inaugural benchmarking due date was intended to be May 1, 2011.  However, on March 21, 2011 the City’s Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability announced that “for at least three months after May 1, 2011, no penalty will be assessed due to failure to comply with the benchmarking requirements of Local Law 84.”  Thus, the deadline for compliance has effectively been extended until August 1, 2011 to allow owners of covered buildings additional time to get acquainted with the benchmarking procedure.

read more
December 20, 2010 | Posted by Daggan, Clinton | Permalink

On November 9, 2010, the New York State Climate Action Council ("Climate Action Council") released the New York State Climate Action Plan Interim Report (the "Interim Report").  The Interim Report describes policy options that aim to achieve greenhouse gas ("GHG") emissions mitigation and better prepare New York State for a changing climate.  The Interim Report is part of Executive Order 24, which was issued by Governor David Paterson in August 2009 and formally established a State goal of reducing GHG emissions 80% below 1990 levels by 2050 ("80 by 50").  The Executive Order established the Climate Action Council to determine how to meet that goal and also to develop a plan to increase New York's ability to adapt to a rapidly changing climate.  The Climate Action Council is seeking public comments until February 7, 2011, and will review those comments before issuing the final Climate Action Plan. 

read more